logo-black

World Health Organization will soon try to change the way people view gender


The World Health Organization will soon try to change the way people view gender by updating a 146-page agency manual with an explanation of gender that, "exists on a continuum and that sex is not limited to male or female."  

The WHO says in light of "new scientific evidence," it's promoting and updating what's called the Gender Mainstreaming Manual that will soon bypass the traditional binary approach and instead, focus on a "non-binary approach" to gender and sexual diversity. 

The manual was created to teach health managers worldwide about gender roles in relation to health-related behaviors. It's widely used, cited, and supports new health care policies and laws. The updates could encourage change in the way people talk about sex and gender. 

As the United Nations' health unit challenges the traditional understanding of gender, critics warn it's a politically-motivated agenda that will cause more confusion. 

"So people can cite the WHO and say, 'follow the experts, follow the science on this,'" said Rebecca Oas, director of research at the Center for Family and Human Rights. 

Oas said the WHO pioneered making transsexuality mainstream in 2018 when it removed it from its list of mental health disorders. 

"Gender Dysmorphia," was formerly listed as the mental illness associated with identifying as transgender. 

"They're really trying to have it both ways," said Oas. "They want to say, 'first of all, there's nothing wrong with you, you're perfectly fine. While also saying, 'we have treatments for you. We can give you surgeries and hormones to fix what's "not" wrong with you.'" 

Updates to the Gender Mainstreaming Agenda include changing key concepts around gender to include power dynamics, privilege, and inequality. The WHO said they want to normalize gender identity outside the biological sex of male and female. Most noteworthy, the plan to introduce lessons and team-building exercises to teach health care professionals that male and female genders inherently discriminate against transgender people, is founded on the concept of intersectionality which is derived from Critical Race Theory. 

"The whole idea of intersectionality has its roots in feminist, Marxist theory and basically turns gender into an oppression Olympics," said Oas. "It says if you belong to more than one oppressed class, that these things can interact in a doubly toxic way."

"It's a way the LGBTQ lobby has worked to insert their agenda into everything else," she continued. "The minute we start talking about inclusivity, then you have to start making a list of ways in which people are oppressed." 

Nicole Hunt, a life issues analyst for Focus on the Family said this is just the beginning of a chain reaction yet to come.

"This is an effort to really intimidate and streamline thinking and talking about this issue," Hunt said. "Even culturally we're seeing this pressure. For instance, just last week, the Merriam-Webster dictionary announced that it was changing its definition of 'female' to include anyone who has "a gender identity that is opposite of male." 

Both Oas and Hunt say the Gender Mainstreaming Manual update is based on political winds, noting the WHO's largest donor is the U.S. government, which provided between $200 million and $600 million annually over the last decade. That money was suspended during President Donald Trump's administration but was reversed when President Biden took office. 

The updated manual will be released in the coming months. Critics encourage parents to learn what's in it to better defend against it. 

"So they're trying to change the narrative about families, and it's something that Christians should be prepared to defend," Hunt said. "What we're going to see is the acceptance of things that are anti-biblical and that is going to influence the laws of this land, and the ways our Constitution is interpreted," Hunt said.

https://www1.cbn.com/cbnnews/world/



Share       

Chinese invasion of Taiwan could come a lot sooner than expected


The timeline for a potential Chinese attempt to take Taiwan by force seems to be getting shorter.

Driving the news: Chinese President Xi Jinping warned President Biden not to "play with fire" over Taiwan on Thursday, according to the Chinese readout of a call between the two leaders.

That contentious exchange comes with Beijing threatening "serious consequences" if House Speaker Nancy Pelosi follows through on a planned visit to the self-governing island.Pelosi's plans and the bellicose response from Beijing have renewed speculation that Taiwan could become a military flashpoint sooner rather than later.The Pentagon has briefed Pelosi about its security concerns around the trip, and Biden has said publicly that the U.S. military thinks it's "not a good idea right now."While all that was happening, the Taiwanese military was conducting a five-day exercise to simulate a Chinese invasion, part of a regular schedule of defense drills conducted each year.

The big picture: The Chinese government has repeatedly vowed to take control of the self-governing island, by force if necessary, and it reacts furiously to any gesture that seems to treat Taiwan as an independent state.

State of play: U.S. and Taiwanese officials have in the past floated various timelines for an invasion, often setting the horizon at 2025 or 2030.

But U.S. officials now believe China may make a strong move against Taiwan within the next 18 months, according to a recent New York Times report, though that estimate is not based on specific knowledge of Beijing's plans.The U.S. and Taiwan need to take these signals as a call to strengthen military cooperation and joint training, a Taiwanese government official in Taipei told Axios. "Whether it's 18 months or seven years from now, we need to start this process now," the official said, "before it's too late."

Yes, but: Neither Washington nor Taipei expects an imminent attack.

Taiwan's top intelligence official, Chen Ming-tong, said in March that it was "highly unlikely" China would move this year.Taiwanese Foreign Minister Joseph Wu said last month that strength of the western response to the Russian invasion serves as a "powerful deterrent" to a potential Chinese assault on Taiwan.CIA Director Bill Burns said last week that no attack is expected immediately but the risks "become higher, it seems to us, the further into this decade that you get."

Meanwhile, China's military posture in the region has become much more aggressive, Ely Ratner, assistant secretary of defense for Indo-Pacific affairs, said on Tuesday.

President Biden has also upped the ante by saying three separate times that the U.S. has committed to defend Taiwan.That's despite the fact that the White House insists there has been no change to the "strategic ambiguity" policy, under which the U.S. takes no explicit position on that issue, or to the "One China Policy," under which the U.S. neither rejects nor accepts Beijing's claims over Taiwan.

Concerns over a potential invasion are also growing in Taiwan, which has taken inspiration from Ukraine's effective defense against Russia.

Officials are considering expanding the country's mandatory military service, the Ministry of Defense issued its first civil defense handbook, and civilians are signing up for civil defense training courses.U.S. officials, meanwhile, have been urging Taiwan to invest more in the kinds of asymmetric warfare capabilities, such as truck-mounted anti-aircraft missiles, that Ukraine has used against Russia.

But it's not just Taiwan that's learning from the Russian invasion.

"I suspect the lesson that the Chinese leadership and military are drawing is that you've got to amass overwhelming force," Burns said

https://www.axios.com/2022/07/29/china-taiwan-xi-pelosi-biden
Share       

Ageing pope admits he must slow down, or quit


Pope Francis admitted Saturday he needs to slow down, telling reporters after a six-day trip to Canada that he cannot maintain his pace of international travel -- and may have to think about retiring.

I don't think I can go at the same pace as I used to travel," said the 85-year-old pope, who suffers pain in his knee that has seen him increasingly reliant on a wheelchair.

"I think that at my age and with this limitation, I have to save myself a little bit to be able to serve the Church. Or, alternatively, to think about the possibility of stepping aside."

It is not the first time Francis has raised the possibility of following the example set by his predecessor, Benedict XVI, who quit over his own failing health in 2013, and is now living quietly in Vatican City.

In 2014, a year into his papacy, Francis told reporters that if his health got in the way of his functions as pope, he would consider stepping down.

In May, as reported in the Italian media, Francis joked about his knee during a closed-door meeting with bishops, saying: "Rather than operate, I'll resign."

"The door is open, it's one of the normal options, but up until now I haven't knocked on this door," he said Saturday.

"But that doesn't mean the day after tomorrow I don't start thinking, right? But right now I honestly don't.

"Also this trip was a little bit the test. It is true that you cannot make trips in this state, you have to maybe change the style a little bit, decrease, pay off the debts of the trips you still have to make, rearrange.

"But the Lord will tell. The door is open, that is true."

Intense speculation

The comments come after intense speculation about Francis's future, after he was forced to cancel a string of events due to his knee pain including a trip to Africa planned for earlier this month.

Talk was also fuelled by his decision to call an extraordinary consistory for August 27, a slow summer month at the Vatican, to create 21 new cardinals -- 16 of whom will be under the age of 80, thereby eligible to elect his successor in a future conclave.

Benedict's decision to quit caused shockwaves through the Catholic Church. He was first pope to resign since the Middle Ages, but the precedent has now been set.

"In all honesty, it is not a catastrophe, it is possible to change pope, it is possible to change, no problem! But I think I have to limit myself a bit with these efforts," Francis said on Saturday.

He mostly used a wheelchair during his trip to Canada, where he offered a historic apology for decades of abuse of Indigenous children at residential schools run by the Catholic Church.

But he did stand up in his "popemobile" to greet crowds.

Francis said surgery on his knee was not an option, adding that he was still feeling the effects of six hours spent under anaesthetic last summer, when he underwent an operation on his colon.

"You don't play, you don't mess around, with anaesthesia," he said.

But he added: "I will try to continue to go on trips and be close to people, because I think it is a way of service, closeness."

Talk was also fuelled by his decision to call an extraordinary consistory for August 27, a slow summer month at the Vatican, to create 21 new cardinals -- 16 of whom will be under the age of 80, thereby eligible to elect his successor in a future conclave.

Benedict's decision to quit caused shockwaves through the Catholic Church. He was first pope to resign since the Middle Ages, but the precedent has now been set.

"In all honesty, it is not a catastrophe, it is possible to change pope, it is possible to change, no problem! But I think I have to limit myself a bit with these efforts," Francis said on Saturday.

He mostly used a wheelchair during his trip to Canada, where he offered a historic apology for decades of abuse of Indigenous children at residential schools run by the Catholic Church.

But he did stand up in his "popemobile" to greet crowds.

Francis said surgery on his knee was not an option, adding that he was still feeling the effects of six hours spent under anaesthetic last summer, when he underwent an operation on his colon.

"You don't play, you don't mess around, with anaesthesia," he said.

But he added: "I will try to continue to go on trips and be close to people, because I think it is a way of service, closeness."

Francis still hopes to reschedule his postponed trip to South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

"But it will be next year, because of the rainy season -- let's see: I have all the good will, but let's see what the leg says," he quipped.

The Argentine pontiff repeated that he would like to visit war-torn Ukraine, but offered no details on the state of his plans.

He has another overseas trip planned for a religious congress in Kazakhstan in September.

"For the moment, I would like to go: it's a quiet trip, without so much movement," the pope said.

https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/20220730-ageing-pope-admits-he-must-slow-down-or-quit
Share